Middle School News



Notice from the Nurse

Posted on: November 25, 2019
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Pertussis also known as “Whooping Cough”

  • A highly contagious respiratory tract infection that is preventable by vaccine and treatable by a medical professional

  • Spreads easily

  • Requires a medical diagnosis and treatment consists of antibiotics

  • Maximizing nutrition, rest and recovery

  • Spreads by airborne respiratory droplets (coughs or sneezes); by saliva (kissing or shared drinks); by skin to skin (handshakes or hugs).

 

This month, the Warren County Health Department has seen an increased number of pertussis cases in Warren County. Pertussis is an infection that affects the airways, and it can easily spread from person to person by coughing or sneezing. Pertussis can cause a severe cough that lasts for weeks or months, sometimes leading to coughing fits and/or vomiting. Anyone can get pertussis, but it can be very dangerous for babies and people with weakened immune systems. Family members with pertussis, especially siblings and parents, can spread pertussis to babies.

Please make sure your family’s vaccinations are up-to-date. Protection against pertussis from the childhood vaccine, DTaP, decreases over time. Older children and adults, including pregnant women, should get a pertussis booster shot called “Tdap” to help protect themselves and babies near or around them. If you need Tdap, contact your doctor or call Warren County Health Department to find a vaccine provider near you.

Recommendations:

  1. If your child has a cough keep your child home from school and activities, such as sports or play groups.

  2. Make an appointment with your child’s doctor as soon as possible

  3. If your child has a weakened immune system, ask your child’s doctor to prescribe antibiotics to your child as soon as possible to prevent pertussis. Doctors should give antibiotics to a child with a weakened immune system if they may have been exposed to pertussis, even if he or she is not coughing.

  4. If your child may have been exposed to Pertussis and your child lives with any of the following people, ask your child’s doctor to prescribe antibiotics as soon as possible to your child, even if he or she is not coughing:

    • A woman who is pregnant

    • A baby younger than 12 months old

    • Anyone with a weakened immune system

  5.  If your child’s doctor says your child does NOT have pertussis: Ask for a note from the doctor telling the school that your child’s cough is NOT pertussis and that your child can return to school and other activities at any time.

  6. If your child has been diagnosed with pertussis by his or her doctor: Tell the school that a doctor diagnosed your child with pertussis. School officials may request that you keep your child home from school and activities, such as sports or play groups, until your child has been on antibiotics for five days to treat pertussis.

     

Should you have any questions or concerns, please call our school nurses.